Династия Романовых: 35 редких фотографий царской семьи

Инстаграм @historyofromanovs рассказывает историю династии Романовых лучше заурядных книжек и даже нового сериала на Netflix. Его создательница — американский фотограф Ребекка Гонзалес — коллекционирует редкие портреты царской семьи: императрицы Александры Федоровны в образе Марии Милославской, княжны Ольги Николаевны в официальной полковой форме и княжны Марии в шляпе с тонкой кутюрной вышивкой. На странице выложено уже почти 1500 различных фотографий — «Собака.ru» публикует те, которые могли бы стать не только учебным пособием, но и гидом по моде тех лет. 

 

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Formal portrait of Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia, formerly Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and by Rhine. A granddaughter of Queen Victoria and an older sister of Alexandra, the last Russian Empress, Elisabeth became famous in Russian society for her beauty and charitable works among the poor. Though she came from one of the oldest and noblest houses in Germany, Elisabeth and her family lived a rather modest life by royal standards. The children swept the floors and cleaned their own rooms, while their mother sewed dresses herself for the children. In this relatively happy and secure environment, Elisabeth grew up surrounded by English domestic habits, and English became her first language. Charming and with a very accommodating personality, Elisabeth was considered by many historians and contemporaries to be one of the most beautiful women in Europe at that time. Elizabeth was among the many Romanovs who were murdered by the Bolsheviks. Elisabeth was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church in the late 20th century.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Portrait of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia dressed as Maria Ilyinichna Miloslavskaya, the first wife of Tsar Alexis. The 1903 ball in the Winter Palace was the last grand costume ball ever held in Imperial Russia. “Masquerades were extremely popular throughout the 19th century, with courtiers disguising themselves as European knights, Chinese grandees, or Russian historical figures. At the last great court ball held in the Winter Palace, in 1903, the Empress Alexandra, one of the few who hated balls, and Petersburg social life generally, wore the costume of an 17th-century tsaritsa. Her dress dripped emeralds, and her earrings were so heavy she could hardly hold up her head.”

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Portrait of little Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia (1904-1918), the youngest child and only son of the last Imperial couple, in a sailor suit with a toy rifle. This photograph was taken on board one of the imperial yachts. “In June [1917], Alexei was playing outside with the toy rifle which he had played with in the garden of the Stavka. Suddenly, the soldiers spotted the gun and began to shout to each other, “They are armed.” Alexei, hearing the hubbub, went to his mother, who was sitting on the grass. A minute later, the soldiers arrived and demanded “the weapon”. Gilliard tried to intervene and explain that the gun was a toy, but the soldiers insisted and walked off with the gun. Alexei, in tears, looked from the Empress to the tutor; both were helpless. The gun was turned over to Colonel Kobylinsky, who was furious that his men had bothered the child. Carefully, he took the gun apart and carrying it under his coat, returned it piece by piece to the Tsarevich. Thereafter, Alexei played with his rifle only behind the doors of his room.” — Robert K. Massie in his book, Nicholas & Alexandra: The Classic Account of the Fall of the Romanov Dynasty.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Family portrait of the Romanovs during World War I. From left to right: Nicholas II, Elizabeth Feodorovna, Maria, Anastasia, Olga, Tatiana and Alexandra Feodorovna. It was during at this time that the waning popularity of the dynasty made its final nosedive. In 1915, Nicholas took command of the failing Russian Army front in World War I. By 1917, most Russians had lost all faith in the leadership ability of the tsar. Government corruption was rampant and the Russian economy was severely damaged by World War I. Moderates joined with radical Bolshevik revolutionaries in calling for an overthrow of the tsar. It resulted in the deaths of everyone in this photograph.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Formal portrait of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia, the wife of Nicholas II, in full court wear, 1906. Alexandra was very supportive of her husband, yet often gave him extreme advice. She was a fervent advocate of the "divine right of kings" and believed that it was unnecessary to attempt to secure the approval of the people, according to her aunt, Empress Frederick of Germany, who wrote to Queen Victoria that "Alix is very imperious and will always insist on having her own way; she will never yield one iota of power she will imagine she wields ..." During World War I, with the national citizens aroused, all the complaints Russians had about the Empress—for instance, her German birth, her poor ideals, her devotion to Rasputin—circled and twisted around the deadly designs that claimed her entire family. Her assassination, according to the daughter of the British ambassador, was openly spoken of in aristocratic drawing rooms as the only way of saving the Empire.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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“Once in 1906, Nicholas was swimming in the surf with his four daughters when a large wave swept over them. The Tsar and the three older daughters rose to the crest of the wave, but Anastasia, then five, disappeared. ‘Little Alexei [aged two] and I saw it happen from the beach,’ wrote the Tsar's sister Olga Alexandrovna. ‘The child, of course, didn't realize the danger, and kept clapping his hands at the tidal wave. Then Nicky dived again, grabbed Anastasia by her long hair, and swam back with her to the beach. I had gone cold with terror.’" - Robert K. Massie, Nicholas and Alexandra. Naturally, Nicholas got upset over this incident and had a swimming pool built aside for the children.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Portrait of the last Russian Imperial children in formal wear, 1911. From left to right: Grand Duchesses Maria, Tatiana, Anastasia, Olga and Tsesarevich Alexei of Russia. While other courts moved on, changing and adapting the dress of their courts, Russia stayed firmly in its Slavic historical mode, and so, from 1834 until 1917, the unusual ethnic dresses of Russian court ladies became instantly recognizable, and a source of pride at home and abroad - Russian women stood out in foreign courts, and at home they made a unforgettable impression on visitors and natives. Gowns of cloth of gold and cloth of silver were reserved for the Empress and the daughters of the Emperor. When the Empress wore cloth of gold (generally only at their coronation), the Grand Duchesses could wear cloth of silver. As most Empresses preferred cloth of silver (it was more flattering, and far less heavy), the Grand Duchesses rarely had the opportunity to wear it except at their weddings, when it was required. For other occasions, the Grand Duchesses wore velvet gowns in a color of their choosing, which was reserved for their exclusive use. The Soviet period saw the end of not only the wearing of court attire, but the virtual extinction of the Russian art of ecclesiastical embroidery. Many of the women who were capable of this type of embroidery fled the revolution, and moved to France, where they were eagerly employed by couturiers such as Patou, Lanvin, and Chanel. — alexanderpalace.org.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia was described as tall and slender, with dark auburn hair and dark blue-gray eyes, fine, chiseled features, and a refined, elegant bearing befitting the daughter of an emperor. She was considered the most beautiful of the four grand duchesses by many courtiers. — Anna Vyrubova recalled that Tatiana became better known to the public than her three sisters because of her attention to duty and her ability to engage those she met. Given her status as the Tsar’s daughter, many people initially felt intimidated in her presence but she always made sure to ease the situation. "With her, as with her mother, shyness and reserve were accounted as pride, but, once you knew her and had gained her affection, this reserve disappeared and the real Tatiana became apparent," Dehn recalled. "She was a poetical creature, always yearning for the ideal, and dreaming of great friendships which might be hers." According to one story, the down-to-earth Tatiana, accustomed to being addressed only by her name and patronymic, was so disconcerted when she was addressed as "Your Imperial Highness" by lady-in-waiting Baroness Sophie Buxhoeveden when she was heading a committee meeting that she kicked the woman under the table and hissed "Are you crazy to speak to me like that?"

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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“Much like her father, Tsar Nicholas II, Olga loved taking long walks in the parks of Tsarskoe Selo. She often said that she would love someday to live in a small village because she loved nature so much more than the city. Olga also loved to sail on the imperial yacht Standart, and enjoyed the annual summer trips to the Black Sea in the Crimea, as well as other family holidays to Finland and Poland. As Olga got older, in addition to her love of nature and the outdoors, she became an even more voracious reader of books: the classics, the history of Russia and works detailing the lives of the peasants, ancient traditions, customs, laws, and geography of her nation. She had an extraordinary memory. According to Meriel Buchanan, the daughter of one of the British ambassador in Russia, Olga never forgot anything that she learned or what she had been told.” Text source: theromanovfamily.com.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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On this day, 120 years ago, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia was born as the third daughter of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. Her great-aunt, Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Saxe-Coburg, likened her to “one of Botticelli’s angels”, and her cheerful disposition led her great-uncle, Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich, to nickname her “The Amiable Baby”. Her governess, Margaretta Eager, was especially fond of her, writing that Maria “…was born good… with the smallest trace of original sin possible.” Maria’s childhood and the grandeur of the 1913 Tercentenary of the Romanov Dynasty passed into memory with the beginning of the First World War. As all of Russia mobilized, the sheltered Imperial daughters were forced to grow up very quickly: hospitals were opened at Tsarskoe Selo, and Olga and Tatiana, along with Empress Alexandra, trained to become Sisters of Mercy, but Maria and Anastasia were deemed too young to be nurses. Nevertheless, the Little Pair were patrons of their own hospitals. They regularly visited and cheered “their” wounded soldiers by playing games with them, sharing their personal photo albums, and asking them questions about life outside the palace walls. The soldiers were initially shy around the grand duchesses, but it did not take long for the easygoing Maria to put them at ease. — The always cheerful, adaptable Maria remained optimistic even after the revolution, befriending the guards and noting to Charles Sydney Gibbes that she would be quite content to remain in Tobolsk forever, if only they were permitted to walk into the town. Once, one of the commissars observed Maria digging with a broken shovel. He inquired as to why she had not asked for a new one and remarked that he had not thought she would have wanted to perform manual labor. “But I love this kind of work,” she replied with surprise. Through the dark, depressing days of the winter of 1917-18, Maria remained cheerful and loving. In July 1918, Maria Nikolaevna Romanova would be murdered along with her parents and four siblings in a Ekaterinburg cellar. She had just turned nineteen mere weeks before. — theromanovfamily.com.

Публикация от 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐑𝐎𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐎𝐕 𝐃𝐘𝐍𝐀𝐒𝐓𝐘 (@historyofromanovs)

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